D.A.'s International Hunt For An Alleged Pedophile Seems Exaggerated

Vos Iz Neias
June 29, 2012

Brooklyn, NY - For years, Avrohom Mondrowitz counseled children out of his home in the Borough Park neighborhood of Brooklyn. He was host of a call-in radio show popular among ultra-Orthodox Jewish listeners, claiming to be a rabbi and psychologist. But law enforcement officials say Mr. Mondrowitz, who fled to Israel in 1984 to avoid arrest, was also something else: "a compulsive pedophile."

The Brooklyn district attorney, Charles J. Hynes, has repeatedly said that since taking office in 1990, he has vigorously tried to extradite Mr. Mondrowitz. Mr. Hynes has said his office was instrumental in bringing about a change in a treaty between the United States and Israel in 2007 that had thwarted early extradition efforts.

But newly disclosed documents from Mr. Hynes's office cast doubts on his accounts of his role in the case, suggesting that for many years, the office paid little attention to it.

Michael Lesher, a writer and lawyer who represents several of Mr. Mondrowitz's accusers, obtained 103 pages of files on the case from the district attorney's office after a protracted court battle to secure them under the state's Freedom of Information Law.

"There isn't a single e-mail, a single letter, a single memo, either originating from the D.A.'s office or addressed to it, that so much as mentions any attempt by the D.A. to seek a change in the extradition treaty," Mr. Lesher said. "It's just inconceivable that such important negotiation on such a detailed issue could have taken place and not left a trace in the documentary record."

Full story at The NY Times